Code of Professional Conduct

Minimum standard of service offered by a member of the Funeral Directors Association of New Zealand (Inc), and by those whose names are entered in the Association’s Register of Funeral Directors.

Standard of Conduct
In dealings with a client, member firms and funeral directors will do everything in their power to ensure a standard of conduct beyond reproach or criticism.

Member firms and those on the FDANZ Register of Funeral Directors shall not offer or give reward for recommendations, and no one should cause or allow any action within a member firm which by deliberate promotion or other means would be calculated to attract business unfairly.

Confidentiality will be preserved at all times and furthermore the details and/or circumstances regarding the deceased or the estate of the deceased will not be divulged except as required by law.

All funeral directors will be thoroughly conversant with and abide completely with the laws of the land as they apply to funerals and to allied industries and professions.

Funeral directors will always deal fairly and honestly, and will not intentionally injure the professional reputation or practice of another funeral director whether a member or not.

Facilities
Members must meet minimum requirements in relation to the facilities they offer. These include
(a) mortuary or holding room
(b) viewing room
(c) office/interview room
(d) work/storage area
(e) hearse

Facilities offered by member firms are subject to the Association’s three yearly inspection.

Transfers
Transfers of human remains will be carried out with due care and in a manner which is acceptable to maintain a standard of decency and hygiene.

All monies, documents, jewellery or personal property accompanying the deceased shall be properly recorded.

Transportation to the church, crematorium, cemetery or any other place will be done in a manner which befits the occasion and does credit to the profession. Funeral personnel will be dressed in a manner that does not detract from the dignity of their profession.

Police Transfers
Where a transfer to a mortuary is performed at the request of an outside agency, the funeral director will await further instructions and will not in any way make the first approach to the deceased’s next of kin.

Mortuary Services and Embalming
All human remains shall be prepared to ensure an acceptable and safe standard of hygiene.

The funeral director should ensure that the client family’s permission to embalm has been received.

Where in such instance the act of embalming is expressly declined during the funeral arrangements, then the funeral director will for his/her own protection obtain a signed indemnity statement to that effect.

Whenever casketed remains are to be transported any distance by another agency, arterial and cavity embalming should be carried out before the commencement of the journey.

The human remains and the casket will be so prepared to ensure that any liquid or gaseous products of decomposition will not escape or cause distress

The Casket
The casket will be so prepared that it could be opened at any time for inspection unless it illegal or unwise to do so.

Other than when required by religious orders, or at the specific request of a client, the internal furnishings of a casket will consist of at least a full length waterproof liner, side drapes, and a pillow or cushion.

Storage And Return Of Ashes
Member firms will maintain a register for the collection, storage and return of ashes.

The firm’s policy regarding the storage of ashes will be clearly conveyed to client families at the arrangement interview.
Administration

Member shall make available a written estimate of all funeral charges and disbursements to be made on a client’s behalf at the time of taking instructions, or as soon as is practicable thereafter.

Members should provide a written agreement setting out the contractual obligations of both parties at the time of taking instructions or as soon as practicable thereafter.

Funeral Planning
Pre-arranging and pre-paying for your funeral may seem like a difficult task, but like making a will, the ideal time to make these plans is well beforehand, when wise choices can be made without worry or stress.